Excision of Melanoma

Excision of Melanoma is a procedure where the physician’s task is the remove the entire growth of cancerous tissue from the body. This is done using a scalpel unlike similar surgeries such as curettage and electrodessication. The growth is removed along with a surrounding border of “normal” tissue as a safety margin. The borders size could vary depending on the depth and progress of the melanoma, but the border tissue usually consists of skin and fat. The wound is then closed and stitched and left to heal. After the procedure, the removed tissue is sent to the laboratory to ensure that all cancerous cells have been removed. Afterwards, small excisions should heal without problems, whereas large excisions or excisions on the hands, feet, or face may require a skin graft to close the wound after surgery. If the melanoma is caught early enough, Excision of Melanoma has a very high cure rate.