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Botox for Men

Men age at a much different rate than women – especially on their face. Increased blood flow to their face (to help support facial hair) provides thicker skin and generally better nourished skin and shaving even helps exfoliate the outer layers of skin, which provides a more youthful appearance. But aging still affects men and men will eventually find themselves with crow’s feet around the eyes, lines on their forehead, or other fine lines throughout their face. Luckily, all of the problems above can be helped with Botox.

Botox is drug made from a toxin, however it is completely safe when used in extremely small doses. Botox basically blocks the nerves in an area from reaching a specific muscle, which causes the muscle to relax and the wrinkle or line to appear less noticeable. It doesn’t necessarily get rid of the wrinkle or line, it just softens its appearance, which makes it practically disappear on your face (on most men, although results may vary). Most men will see results within a week or two and the results usually last 3 – 6 months, depending on how many times you have had Botox before. Some men will even begin to get routine Botox injections before they see the lines or wrinkles – which helps keep them at bay and helps provide an “eternally youthful” appearance for years to come.

One fear of Botox injections can be that your face will appear frozen and everyone will know that you had “work” done. This is just a myth and is completely false. Botox will just smooth the area around the injection and will not cause your face to look or feel frozen. Think of it as a filter that you have on your camera, just applied to your face 24 hours a day. This quick treatment can provide you with a more youthful appearance and no one will ever know that you had Botox injections – only you will know the truth.

If you are considering Botox, please call our office and let us help you turn back the clock on your skin.

Disclaimer: This blog pro­vides gen­eral infor­ma­tion and dis­cus­sion about medical, cosmetic, mohs, and surgical dermatology. The words and other con­tent pro­vided in this blog, and in any linked mate­ri­als, are not intended and should not be con­strued as med­ical advice. If the reader or any other per­son has a med­ical con­cern, he or she should con­sult with an appropriately-licensed dermatologist or other health care worker.