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Hyperhidrosis: Got Excessive Sweat? Ask DermIndy about our Research Study!

Facebook 1Got sweat? Got excessive sweat? Maybe you’ve heard of axillary hyperhidrosis—defined as uncontrollable, excessive underarm sweating. Not only is it inconvenient, but for people that live with it hyperhidrosis can be embarrassing and annoying. Only half of people with hyperhidrosis are never diagnosed or treated, despite the fact that it is a medical condition. Especially if sweating changes your lifestyle to where you isolate yourself, you should look into possible treatment options through the Dermatology Center of Indiana.

Antiperspirant: These topical, non-invasive options are an easy treatment. Options include antiperspirant, clinical antiperspirant, and prescription antiperspirant. Clinical antiperspirants have only hit the market in recent years. In some studies clinical-strength has been shown to be as effective as prescription strength, but with much less irritation.

Really? Botox as a treatment? Yes! If antiperspirants aren’t cutting it, Botox is a possible treatment option. Botox injections in the underarms may drastically reduce sweating. What’s exciting to note here is that studies show a Botox underarm treatment lasts several months longer than the Botox treatment you’re used to getting for facial muscles.

Laser treatments: Lasers can be very effective in the battle against underarm sweat by targeting the sweat glands in the underarm area. The energy of the laser ablates the function of the sweat glands. Laser treatments are typically easily tolerated with just local anesthesia, and offer the benefit of no downtime.

Through the Indiana Clinical Trials Center we’re offering a research study for excessive sweating. If you’d like to learn more, please call (317) 837-6082 and speak with Steve. Follow us on Facebook to stay current on DermIndy promotions, events, and news. You can also find us on Twitter and YouTube. Thank you!

Disclaim: This blog pro­vides gen­eral infor­ma­tion and dis­cus­sion about medical, cosmetic, mohs, and surgical dermatology. The words and other con­tent pro­vided in this blog, and in any linked mate­ri­als, are not intended and should not be con­strued as med­ical advice. If the reader or any other per­son has a med­ical con­cern, he or she should con­sult with an appropriately-licensed dermatologist or other health care worker.

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