Kybella vs. Double Chin Removal Creams & Medicines

If you are suffering from a double chin or extra fat in the chin area, you may be researching what your options are for improving your appearance. In a quick search online, you will see many sites promising double chin removal or reduction via the use of cream or medication. What is important to keep in mind while researching these so-called “miracle creams” is that none of these treatments are FDA approved! The only FDA approved treatment of double-chins is Kybella.

Kybella is an injectable treatment that helps patients get rid of double chins. While this may sound too good to be true, according to Kybella’s website over 72% of patients experienced a moderate improvement in their appearance and 15% of patients experienced a significant improvement in their appearance after only 6 treatments! And Kybella is considered a permanent treatment for fat reduction in the chin area!

Approved by the FDA in 2015, the active ingredient in Kybella is synthetic deoxychoic acid, which is a naturally occurring molecule that helps to breakdown and absorb dietary fat. Kybella is injected into the fat beneath the chin and begins destroying the fat cells. Results can take a few weeks to be seen and most patients need between 2 – 6 treatments, but the best part is that many patients’ results last up to 5 years! Kybella is best effective when treating double chin (or fat in that area) due to genetics and not weight gain.

There are very little risks associated with this treatment, although you may have some side effects including swelling and tenderness in the area after your treatments.

To schedule a consultation to see if Kybella is the right treatment for you, please call us at 317-838-9911 (Plainfield) or 317-732-8980 (Zionsville).

Disclaimer: This blog pro­vides gen­eral infor­ma­tion and dis­cus­sion about medical, cosmetic, mohs, and surgical dermatology. The words and other con­tent pro­vided in this blog, and in any linked mate­ri­als, are not intended and should not be con­strued as med­ical advice. If the reader or any other per­son has a med­ical con­cern, he or she should con­sult with an appropriately-licensed dermatologist or other health care worker.