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Does Botox Hurt?

Many people are squeamish around needles and rightfully so! Watching a sharp medical tool penetrate your skin is alarming and has the ability to make even the toughest person feel a bit woozy.

A fear of needles and a general fear of pain are a few of the big reasons why people decide against Botox treatments. Even if a patient could greatly benefit from Botox injections, the anxiety of facing is discomfort outweighs any possible advantages.

That’s why it’s important to dispel the myths around Botox so more patients can experience its awesome benefits!

For starters, what is Botox exactly? In science-speak, Botox is made from the toxin produced by a bacterium called clostridium botulinum. If that last word sounds familiar, that’s because it’s the same toxin that causes a type of food poisoning called botulism. But don’t worry, Botox is completely safe and effective when used in small doses. In fact, Botox was the most popular cosmetic surgery treatment available in 2015, with more than more than 6.7 procedures.

How does Botox work? Botox works by reducing the activity of muscles in the face that overtime lead to fine lines and wrinkles. By blocking nerve signals to that cause muscles to contract, the injected muscle will relax and soften.

In addition to reducing the cosmetic appearance of fine lines and wrinkles, FDA-approved uses for Botox include treating chronic migraines, severe underarm sweating, muscle spasm, and some eye conditions.

So really, does Botox hurt? Like any needle injection, Botox can cause minor discomfort. Because of the varying sensitivities among patients’ skin, you may feel quick pinches of pain with some injections or none at all. Either way, the discomfort is short-lived and will only last a few seconds. The entire treatment only lasts about 5-10 minutes. And if you’re especially worried, the area can be numbed with a topical anesthetic cream or cold pack.

One of the reasons by Botox causes minimal pain is because the needles are very, very small. Most dermatologist, if not all, use needles that are about a 30 gauge. For reference, this needle size is very similar to what diabetics use on a daily basis for their insulin shots.

Anytime you use a needle, there is a slight risk of some light bruising. Your odds of bruising will again depend on your level of skin sensitivity. Just keep in mind that any bruising is not from Botox itself, but from the needle hitting a blood vessel.

The Dermatology Center of Indiana services Frankfort, Kokomo, Lafayette, West Lafayette and Lebanon along with many other cities throughout Indiana. Join us today in one of our locations where you are always welcome!

Disclaim: This blog pro­vides gen­eral infor­ma­tion and dis­cus­sion about medical, cosmetic, mohs, and surgical dermatology. The words and other con­tent pro­vided in this blog, and in any linked mate­ri­als, are not intended and should not be con­strued as med­ical advice. If the reader or any other per­son has a med­ical con­cern, he or she should con­sult with an appropriately-licensed dermatologist or other health care worker.