/* */

Freckles, Skin Tags, and Moles: What to Watch For

Freckles, skin tags, and moles—Oh my! We all have small dots on our skin. Some we’re born with, some we develop over time. But what are they exactly? And when should you be concerned?

Freckles

Freckles are flat groups of concentrated melaninized cells. They’re most noticeable on individuals with fair complexions, but can be found on any skin color. Freckles are mainly hereditary, but sun exposure can also increase the number of freckles on your skin. This is because freckles develop appear when your skin produces more melanin pigment in response to UV rays. 

Skin tags

A skin tags is a small, soft benign skin growth that while harmless, can be annoying and unsightly. People usually develop skin tags on their eyelids, armpits, and neck and once removed, they don’t usually grow back. While treatment isn’t necessary, removal may be recommended if the skin tag causes discomfort. Removal can include freezing, cutting, or burning.

Mole

A mole is a growth on the skin that can occur anywhere on the body. It’s quite common to have dozens of moles by the time you reach middle age and it’s also common for them to change slowly. Some moles will become raised, change colors, or slowly disappear. While most moles are not dangerous, it’s important to recognize signs of change that could potentially be a warning sign.

When examining a mole, use ABCDE’s of melanoma to determine if an appointment with your dermatologist is necessary:

  • Asymmetry (not equal on both sides if you draw a line down the middle)
  • Borders (uneven, fuzzy)
  • Color (moles with two shades of color)
  • D(larger than 6mm)
  • Evolving (if you notice any changes, please see a dermatologist)

Come visit our staff! We’re happy to serve patients in Plainfield, Martinsville, Greenwood, Carmel and other locations around the State. We look forward to working with you or your family soon.

Disclaim: This blog pro­vides gen­eral infor­ma­tion and dis­cus­sion about medical, cosmetic, mohs, and surgical dermatology. The words and other con­tent pro­vided in this blog, and in any linked mate­ri­als, are not intended and should not be con­strued as med­ical advice. If the reader or any other per­son has a med­ical con­cern, he or she should con­sult with an appropriately-licensed dermatologist or other health care worker.