How Does Botox Work? The Dermatology Center of Indiana

Do you remember this annoying threat from your mother: “If you keep making that face, it will get stuck like that!

Isn’t it annoying when she’s right? It was so easy not to heed her advice as a child because your youth seemed to stretch on endlessly before you. But times flies and before you know it, you’re looking at the lines in your face and thinking, “Wow, my face did get stuck like that!”

Of course mom’s advice was just a way to keep you from making goofy faces in public, but the sentiment rings true. You spend your years smiling, laughing, and furrowing your brow. Yet as you begin to age, gravity takes its toll and your skin begins to lose collagen. Now those crinkles around your eyes linger after you finish laughing or smiling.

You don’t have to stop finding the humor in life, but you can improve the look of fine lines and wrinkles with Botox!

Botox is made from the toxin produced by a bacterium called clostridium botulinum. If it sounds familiar, that’s because it’s the same toxin that causes a type of food poisoning called botulism. But don’t worry, Botox is completely safe and effective when used in small doses. In fact, Botox is the most popular cosmetic surgery treatment available today. According to The American Society of Plastic Surgeons, over 6.7 million Botox procedures were performed in the United States alone.

Botox’s approved uses include the treatment of muscle spasms, severe underarm sweating, chronic migraine headaches, and of course, wrinkles. Botox works by reducing the activity of muscles in the face that overtime lead to fine lines and wrinkles. By blocking nerve signals that cause muscles to contract, the injected muscle will relax and soften.

The effects of Botox last about 3-12 months, depending on the area that you have treated.

The Dermatology Center of Indiana services Frankfort, Kokomo, Lafayette, West Lafayette and Lebanon along with many other cities throughout Indiana. Join us today in one of our locations where you are always welcome!

Disclaim: This blog pro­vides gen­eral infor­ma­tion and dis­cus­sion about medical, cosmetic, mohs, and surgical dermatology. The words and other con­tent pro­vided in this blog, and in any linked mate­ri­als, are not intended and should not be con­strued as med­ical advice. If the reader or any other per­son has a med­ical con­cern, he or she should con­sult with an appropriately-licensed dermatologist or other health care worker.