Medical Uses for Botox

When most people think of Botox, they think of injections into the face that reduce the cosmetic appearance of fine lines and wrinkles. But did you know that Botox has many medical uses that have nothing to do with the physical signs of aging? When it comes right down to it, Botox has several practical uses that can improve the lives of men and women of all ages!

Botox is made from the toxin produced by a bacterium called clostridium botulinum. If it sounds familiar, that’s because it’s the same toxin that causes a type of food poisoning called botulism. But don’t worry, Botox is completely safe and effective when used in small doses. In fact, Botox is the most popular cosmetic surgery treatment available today. According to The American Society of Plastic Surgeons, over 6.7 million Botox procedures were performed in the United States alone.

It’s true that the most popular use of Botox is to get rid of unwanted lines around your eyes and forehead. It works by reducing the activity of muscles in the face that overtime lead to fine lines and wrinkles. By blocking nerve signals to that cause muscles to contract, the injected muscle will relax and soften.

Other common medical uses for Botox include (and some may surprise you):

  • certaineye disorders such as crossed eyes and uncontrolled blinking
  • incontinence
  • muscle stiffness/spasms or movement disorders
  • chronic migraines
  • hyperhidrosis, or excessive sweating
  • overactive bladder
  • depression (though not FDA approved)
  • premature ejaculation (though not FDA approved)
  • postoperative atrial fibrillation, or abnormal heartbeat after surgery (though not FDA approved)

The Dermatology Center of Indiana services Frankfort, Kokomo, Lafayette, West Lafayette and Lebanon along with many other cities throughout Indiana. Join us today in one of our locations where you are always welcome!

Disclaim: This blog pro­vides gen­eral infor­ma­tion and dis­cus­sion about medical, cosmetic, mohs, and surgical dermatology. The words and other con­tent pro­vided in this blog, and in any linked mate­ri­als, are not intended and should not be con­strued as med­ical advice. If the reader or any other per­son has a med­ical con­cern, he or she should con­sult with an appropriately-licensed dermatologist or other health care worker.