/* */

Top 3 Questions About Mohs Surgery

Mohs micrographic surgery

When you hear the term “Mohs micrographic surgery”, your first question is probably, “What it is?” But if you or someone you know was recently diagnosed with skin cancer, your question will likely be, “Can you tell me more about it?”

Mohs micrographic surgery is one of the most effective methods for removing and treating common skin cancers. Using a scalpel to slowly and delicately cut out layers of cancerous skin, a Mohs surgeon is able to remove the tumor while maintaining as much healthy tissue as possible. The removed tissue is viewed under a microscope and the surgeon will repeat the process until visible tumor roots are no longer visible.

Here are the top 3 questions we receive about the Mohs micrographic surgery:

1.) Is it painful? In short, the answer is no. The Mohs technique only requires local anesthetic and patients are awake for the entire procedure. Most patients experience minimal discomfort and don’t need pain medication afterwards. The level of discomfort will range based on the location of the cancer and how many layers of skin needed to be removed.

2.) Does Mohs surgery require a long recovery? The answer to that question will again vary depending on the size, location, and complexity of the cancer. Time away from physical activity can take anywhere from a few days to a few weeks. The surgical scar left from the procedure can take anywhere from 12-18 months to fully heal.

3.) The most important we get as Mohs surgery effective? The answer is absolutely yes. Since the Mohs technique only removes tissue where cancer is present and preserves healthy tissue, patients have a cure rate of 98 percent. There’s a reason why this has been one of the most proven method since the 1930s!

The Dermatology Center of Indiana services Brownsburg, Cicero, Crawfordsville, and Fishers along with many other cities throughout Indiana. Join us today in one of our locations where you are always welcome!

Disclaim: This blog pro­vides gen­eral infor­ma­tion and dis­cus­sion about medical, cosmetic, mohs, and surgical dermatology. The words and other con­tent pro­vided in this blog, and in any linked mate­ri­als, are not intended and should not be con­strued as med­ical advice. If the reader or any other per­son has a med­ical con­cern, he or she should con­sult with an appropriately-licensed dermatologist or other health care worker.